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Watching Sunset

neutr1n02001's picture

Watching Sunset on the Ferry from Victoria to Vancouver

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IPSC Victoria Match

neutr1n02001's picture

It's been almost a year since my first IPSC match last year. I would have lost qualification and had to take the black badge course again if I didn't do this match!

The stage design were done very well. I've been wondering if the designer got some engineering background. Very confusing and tricky set up. It made today’s game very challenging, and super fun! Some targets were well hidden behind the barrels, easily to be forgotten. Some targets could be engaged from different positions, made you wondering whether it was already been engaged at or not. I've missed three enemy targets (FTE) and accidentally shot two neutral targets (No Shoot) today. Pre-planning is very important for this kind of tricky stages. I saw grand masters committed a few FTE as well! Of course not as many as I did, and they shoot a lot faster too! To do well in this game, skill itself is not enough, brain power also counts. I suddenly felt my memory was not deep enough to keep track all the steps in my plan!

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Deer Jump

neutr1n02001's picture

Leaving Victoria Fish and Game Club, saw a baby deer jumped across the trail in front of my jeep (1:53 to 2:00). Poor deer! I bet she couldn't rest well that day with the guns firing non-stop all day long.

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Dr. Strangelove Moment in Crisis Management?

rickackerman's picture

A front-page story in the Wall Street Journal over the weekend reads like spin control as managed by the Federal Reserve: Crises Fall Short Of Going Global‘. This orchestrated sigh of relief reminds one of the scene from Dr. Strangelove when the George C. Scott character, Gen. ‘Buck Turgidson’, offers up a prayer in the War Room when it appears that the U.S. has successfully thwarted an accidental nuclear attack on Russia. Turns out they were wrong: One bomber has actually slipped under Soviet radar, dropping a nuclear payload that would trigger The Doomsday Machine.

Well, it’s true that the financial markets have not collapsed as they did in 2007, notwithstanding the fact that the news from Greece and China has been more than a little worrisome. But to infer that the financial system is in the clear simply because there has not been a panic seems to be inviting trouble. To be sure, the reporters who filed the story, Greg Ip and Jon Hilsenrath, are two of the Journal‘s best. And they do make clear that any number of problems, some of them not even on the banksters’ radar, could set off a financial chain reaction that could have devastating consequences for the global economy and the banking system. But the emphasis is mainly on the “good” story about how well we seem to be coping. So far.

Airlines an Indicator of America's Decline

rickackerman's picture

Government regulators have threatened an inquiry into whether the airlines have colluded to keep fares high. Isn’t the answer obvious? Of course they have! How else could they have grown to their recent pinnacle of profitability, even as their customers have come to curse them with a vehemence they once reserved for TV cable providers? The carriers’ understandable efforts to boost a sagging bottom line began decades ago with changes in ticketing policy that made it prohibitively expensive to modify or cancel a reservation. Thus did they turn a service that used to be free, and which remains free at most other service-oriented businesses, including hotels, into a profit center. More recently, the carriers have nickle-and-dimed passengers to death, charging extra for each checked bag and even for items stored in the overhead bin. At the same time, seat widths and leg room have shrunk to the point where it is no longer possible to fly comfortably unless you’re on a first class ticket. Even then, the first-class experience is no better in many instances than the economy class amenities of 20 years ago. My main experience is with Frontier, which, to create the illusion of more leg room, recently began to install “streamlined” seats that feature a wafer-thin layer of padding with about as much give as a surgical table.

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